Rutgers Essay 2012

Essay Contest

The program in Russian and East European Languages and Literatures at Rutgers is proud to participate in the annual

Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest
sponsored by the American Council of Teachers in Russian

Students from colleges and universities across the country participate in this essay contest, which is judged by judges in Russia. We also award prizes for winners at each level from Rutgers.

 


2017 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest Award Winners from Rutgers

In this year's contest, there were 1,326 essays submitted from 67 universities, colleges, and institutions across the nation. Three judges read each essay and independently ranked them.

Valeriya Timoshenko, Bronze Medal (Heritage Learners, Level 3)
Bogdana Bartkiv, Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners of other Slavic languages, Level 2)
Rachel Kandyba, Bronze Medal (Heritage Learners, Level 2)

Liliya Bondarenko, Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 2)
Marina Shimarova, Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 2)
Mar Nikiforova, Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 4)

2017 Rutgers Russian Essay Contest Results

Non-heritage level 102, section 02
1st Place: Gregory Melillo
2nd Place: Erik Fountain
3rd Place: Matthew Romero

Non-heritage level 102, section 03
1st Place: Andre Pereldik
2nd Place: Andres Escobar
3rd Place: Brenna Yellin
Honorable Mention: Haleigh Hamrick

Non-heritage level 202
1st Place: Marisa Gallicchio
2nd Place: Dezzie Ligon III
3rd Place: Cordelia Turner
Honorable Mention: Bogdana Bartkiv

Heritage level 208
1st Place: Liliya Bondarenko

Level 402
1st Place: Mar Nikiforova
2nd Place: Valeriya Timoshenko
3rd Place: Margarita Brown


2016 National Post-Secondary Russian Essay Contest Award Winners from Rutgers

In this year's contest, there were 1,415 essays submitted from 79 universities, colleges, and institutions across the nation. Three judges read each essay and independently ranked them.

Silver Medal (Heritage Learners, Level 2), Daniel Kats
Bronze Medal (Heritage Learners of Other Slavic Languages, Level 2), Bogdana Bartkiv

2016 Rutgers Essay Contest Winners

Non-heritage level 102

1st Place: Bogdana Bartkiv
2nd Place: Amy Schwartz
3rd Place: Marisa Gallicchio
Honorable Mention: Cordelia Turner

Non-heritage level 202
1st Place: Mikaela Peters
2nd Place: Brenda Rios
3rd Place: Kurt Butka

Heritage level 208
1st Place: Michelle Chekunova
2nd Place: Oksana Sokolova
3rd Place: Daniel Kats

Level 302
1st Place: Kristina Beschastnova
2nd Place: Mar Nikiforova
3rd Place: Stephen Cholewka

Level 402
1st Place: Tatiana Bereznikova
2nd Place: Irada Yusunova
3rd Place: Raul Aguilar
Honorable Mention: Ksenija Tihomirova

 


2015 National ACTR Winners from Rutgers

Gold Medal (Heritage Learners, Level 4), Olga Dovhanyuk
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 5), Tatiana Bereznikova
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 4), Mar Nikiforova
Honorable Mention (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 2), Aleksandra Wec
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 1), Dimitry Apollonsky

 In this year's national contest, there were 1,087 essays submitted from 68 universities, colleges, and institutions across the nation. Each essay was ranked by three judges in Russia, and often the resultswere simply too close to call.

2015 Rutgers Essay Contest Winners

Best Essay, Non-Heritage
Ireen Ha

Non-Heritage Level 102
1st Place: Amalia Pederson
2nd Place: Aleksandra Wec
3rd Place: Brenda Rios
Honorable Mention: Caroline Clark, Bridget Macavoy

Non-Heritage Level 202
1st Place: Nicholas Sun
2nd Place: Olympia Christofinis
3rd Place: Michael Orama

Heritage Level 208
1st Place: Mar Nikiforova
2nd Place: Daniel Shifman
3rd Place: David Lubashevski

Level 302/402
1st Place: Tatiana Bereznikova
2nd Place: Luka Rekhviashvili
3rd Place: Raul Aguilar


2014 National ACTR Winners from Rutgers

We had a record number of national winners from Rutgers this year - 14 of our students won awards at the national level!

First Place (Heritage Learners, Level 3), Solomiya Stebelska
Second Place (Heritage Learners, Level 1), Nadiya Chuchvara
Third Place (Heritage Learners, Level 4), Iulia Bardareanu
Third Place (Heritage Learners, Level 2), Carolyn Czarnecki
Third Place (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 2), Raul Aguilar
Third Place (Heritage Learners, Level 1), Marina Shayevich and Anna Volski
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 1), Patrick Parlej, Ronen Shor and Michael Boutoussov
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 2), Robert Svechin
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 3), Margarita Brown
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 4), Tatiana Bereznikova and Dmitry Strykas

In this year's national contest, there were 1,004 essays submitted from 58 universities, colleges, and institutions across the nation. Each essay was ranked by three judges in Russia, and often the results were simply too close to call.

2014 Rutgers Essay Contest Winners

Non-Heritage Level 102
1st Place: Timothy Hartmann
2nd Place: Nicholas Sun
3rd Place: Olympia Christofinis
Honorable Mention: Philip Wythe

Non-Heritage Level 202
1st Place: Raul Aguilar
2nd Place: Tristan Kernan
3rd Place: Anthony Arias-Amaya

Heritage Level 208
1st Place: Margarita Brown
2nd Place: Marina Shayevich
3rd Place: Irada Yunusova

Level 302/402
1st Place: Iulia Bardareanu
2nd Place: Dmitry Styrkas
3rd Place: Tatiana BereznikovaHonorable Mention: Kirill Abramov


2013 National ACTR Winners from Rutgers

Second Place (Heritage Learners, Level 1) Anna Volski
Third Place (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 1) Jason Kancylarz
Honorable Mention (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 1) Raul Aguilar

In this year's national contest, there were 946 essays submitted from 57 universities and colleges. Each essay was ranked by three judges in Russia, and often the results were simply too close to call.

2013 Rutgers Essay Contest Winners

Best Essay Heritage
Anna Volski

Non-heritage Level 102
1st place Raul Aguilar
2nd place Jessica Ackerman and Tristan Kernan
3rd place David Gifford
Honorable Mention: Lyutsiya Yokobchuk

Non-Heritage Level 202
1st place Jason Kancylarz
2nd place Carolyn Czarnecki
3rd place Mel Bandler

Heritage Level 108
1st place Irada Yunusova
2nd place Mikhail Fishbeyn and Andrey Volfson
3rd place Anne Kavalerchik

Heritage Level 208
1st place Danielle Levin
2nd place Daniel Nazarenko
3rd place Dina Finkel

Level 302
1st place Amanda Goen
2nd place Solomiya Stebelska
3rd place Daria Napolina


2012 National ACTR Winners from Rutgers

Honorable Mention (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 3) Kyle S Barry
First Place (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 2) Giselle Hsu and Solomiya Stebelska 
Second Place (Heritage Learners, Level 1) Maryna Sidykh

In this year's contest, there were 1,057 essays submitted from 48 universities and colleges. Each essay was ranked by three judges in Russia, and often the results were simply too close to call. 

2012 Rutgers Essay Contest Winners

Best Essay Non-heritage
Giselle Hsu

Best Essay Heritage
Maryna Sidykh

Non-heritage Level 102
1st place Valentina Janus-Suric
2nd place Nina Dudko
3rd place Guliz Solmaz

Heritage Level 1
1st place Borys Derevyanko
2nd place Naomi Braginsky
3rd place Daniel Nazarenko
Honorable Mention Naomi Braginsky and Aleksey Chaikovsky

Heritage Level 2
1st place Sergiy Dmytruk
2nd place Giselle Hsu and Daria Napolina
3rd place Nikola Kendis and Solomiya Stebelska

Non-Heritage Level 202
2nd place Amanda Goen
3rd place Emily G. Kimball
Honorable mention Kymberleig Albites

Level 4
1st place Kyle Barry
2nd place Rebecca Gangi
Honorable Mention Andrew Agranovich, Max Hoyt, and Yevhen Zariczny


2012 National ACTR Winners

Honorable Mention (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 2) Kyle S Barry
Second Place (Non-Heritage Learners, Level 3) Robert P Campana
Second Place (Heritage Learners, Level 1) Maryna Sidykh
Honorable Mention (Heritage Learners, Level 3) Anthony M Polansky


In this year's contest, there were 702 essays submitted from 51 universities and colleges. Each essay was ranked by three judges in Russia, and often the results were simply too close to call. Over 100 students from 40 institutions throughout the United States win gold, silver, bronze, or honorable mention certificates.

2011 Rutgers Essay Contest Winners

Best Essay Non-heritage
Robert Campana

Best Essay Heritage
Maryna Sidych

Non-heritage Level 102
1st place Philip Berman
2nd Place Amanda Goen
3rd Place Emily Kimball

Heritage Level 1
2nd place Dimitriy Shumaev
2nd place Richard Shalmiyev
3rd place Erica Lunin

Heritage Level 2
1st place Maryna Sidykh
2nd place Michael Zilman
3rd place Olga Kozlova
3rd place Martyn Mazurek

Non-Heritage Level 201
1st place Elizabeth Taylor
2nd place Matthew Sands
3rd place Eric Rogers

Non-Heritage Level 202
1st place Kyle Barry
2nd place Sonia Szczesna
3rd place Rebecca Gangi
3rd place Tanya Jargowsky

Level 3-4
1st place Robert Campana
2nd place Liza Labudzeva
3rd place Kristine Kowalski

Honorable Mention for Originality
Mark Delendra, Helen Janiszewski and Nataliya Esperson


A study led by Professor Kent D. Harber indicates public school teachers under-challenge minority students by providing them more positive feedback than white students.

Remember that teacher you grumbled about back in your school days, the really tough one who made you work so hard, insisted you could do better, and made you sweat for your A’s? The one you didn’t appreciate until after you graduated and realized how much you had learned?

Minority students in the U.S. might have fewer of those teachers, at least compared to white students, and as a result they might be at a significant learning disadvantage. 

A major study, led by Rutgers-Newark psychology professor Kent D. Harber, indicates that public school teachers under-challenge minority students by providing them more positive feedback than they give to white students, for work of equal merit.  The study, which is currently available online at http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2012-10763-001/ in the Journal of Educational Psychology (JEP), involved 113 white middle school and high school teachers in two public school districts located in the New York/New Jersey/Connecticut tri-state area, one middle class and white, and the other more working class and racially mixed.

Teachers read and commented on a poorly written essay which they believed was composed by a student in a writing class.  Some teachers thought the student was black, some thought the student was Latino, and some thought that the student was white.  Teachers believed that their feedback would be sent directly to the student, in order to see how the student would benefit from their comments and advice.

In fact, there was no actual student, and the poorly written essay was developed by Harber and his team.  The real purpose was to see how teachers would respond to subpar work due to the race of the student who composed it.   As Harber and his team predicted, the teachers displayed a “positive feedback bias,” providing more praise and less criticism if they thought the essay was written by a minority student than by a white student. 

An important aspect of the positive bias was that it depended on how much social support teachers received from their fellow teachers and administrators—but only if the student was black.  In This case, teachers lacking social support showed the positive bias,  while those who enjoyed support did not show the bias.   Teachers who thought the student was Latino showed the bias, regardless of their school-based social support.

“The social implications of these results are important; many minority students might not be getting input from instructors that stimulates intellectual growth and fosters achievement,” notes Harber.  “Some education scholars believe that minorities under-perform because they are insufficiently challenged—the ‘bigotry of lowered expectations,’ in popular parlance,” he explains. “The JEP study indicates one important way that this insufficient challenge might occur: in positively biased feedback,” according to Harber.

Harber believes that the positive feedback bias might help explain the stubborn academic performance gap between minority students and white students, an enduring social problem that threatens to “reverse social successes won through legislation, jurisprudence, and changing cultural attitudes” toward minorities.  Previous attempts to address the performance gap have, correctly, examined inequalities in school funding, racism, and distrust of academia in some minority communities, notes the report. 

The current study suggests that the performance gap might also be due to a cause that has received relatively little attention: the nature of instructional feedback from white teachers to minority students.   

Harber believes the study’s findings have implications not only for educational systems in the U.S. but also for businesses and in fact any organization where performance appraisals and feedback are crucial tools for training and development.   

The study builds on and expands Harber’s previous demonstrations of the positive feedback bias, involving college students in 1998 and in 2004, and teacher trainees in  2010.  His partners on this latest study are: Jamie L. Gorman and Frank P. Gengaro, Rutgers University, Newark; Samantha Butisingh and William Tsang, Rutgers University, New Brunswick; and Rebecca Ouellette, Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Harber and his team believe their findings could have broad implications for teachers, parents and students, and business leaders.  He is available to explain in detail how the research was conducted, who was involved, the analysis and outcomes.   

Media Contact: Carla Capizzi
973/353-5263
E-mail: capizzi@rutgers.edu

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Rutgers Essay 2012”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *