Prairiewave Static Host Assignment Discovery

A Cryptome DVD is offered by Cryptome. Donate $25 for a DVD of the Cryptome 11-years archives of 41,000 files from June 1996 to June 2007 (~4.4 GB). Click Paypal or mail check/MO made out to John Young, 251 West 89th Street, New York, NY 10024. Archives include all files of cryptome.org, jya.com, cartome.org, eyeball-series.org and iraq-kill-maim.org. Cryptome offers with the Cryptome DVD an INSCOM DVD of about 18,000 pages of counter-intelligence dossiers declassified by the US Army Information and Security Command, dating from 1945 to 1985. No additional contribution required -- $25 for both. The DVDs will be sent anywhere worldwide without extra cost.

November 2, 2007: To the source of NSA-IP Resources: A journalist would appreciate contact. If interested, send encrypted message to jya[at]pipeline.com (Cryptome). Use public key here.

2 November 2007

A writes:

Subject: http://cryptome.org/nsa-ip-update11.htm

I'm curious about this list of class A IP blocks. Many of them are commercial multinational organizations. I find it hard to believe that the secretary whose desk has a static IP in one of those blocks is NSA friendly for example. So I'm curious, how have you defined "NSA friendly"? I'm aware of some of the DNS' you've listed, and they are core routers, or web proxies for an organization. Do you mean for example the devices in question are attached to a "blackbox" in the same cage they are in? As in some cases, that may not be at the discretion of the IP block owner. Just looking for your definition of "NSA friendly".

Cryptome:

The source of the files has not explained "NSA friendly."

I'd assume that it would mean technically friendly and users of the IPs are not necessarily witting, as you surmise. Some might be but most not, in the same way that commercial data gatherers don't inform IP hosts and users of what they are gathering. (IP hosts claim they don't want to know, hah!, they know, just don't want to admit culpability.)

Covert spying is rampant on the net, not only by NSA but IP hosts themselves, along with the whole gang which operates the system from international corps to little local hosts and individuals with knowledge of how easy it is to do. And everybody accuses others of doing what they do. Net security firms and public interest protectors could be more treacherous than the usual suspects, for all are unregulated and continually warn of threats to garner business and contributions.

Nobody spies and lies about it more than the media, well, except for doctors, lawyers, teachers, preachers, on down the list of "trusted professionals." All friendly, they are, peddling trust, inflaming fear and suspicion -- Cryptome no different.

No official spying can happen without participation by private parties and commercial firms. And hundreds of thousands benefit by keeping threats alive and kicking, the few true threats buried under the mountain of lies. There are no greater conspiracy theory hawkers than fat and comfy national security and privacy crowds who disdain the amateurs and forever prattle about reputation and trust.

As others have noted, the NSA IPs could be a diversion from the humongous spying going on by less suspect parties. The Net is a perfect spying machine, especially for so-called non-spies -- believe it, there are no non-spies, period.

A true list of compromised IPs would list the whole Internet, then on to the fuller range open mouth blabbering of blogs, email, chat rooms, texting, aided and abetted by the world's telecoms, postal services, and, most reliably, bedroom  murmurings.

Our era is defined by its universal spying under guise of enlightened civilization. Bitter victims and their well-paid predators are certain that is what civilization was invented to hide. Ponder Wall Street and its military protectors but don't ever think about their vast multitudes of emulators, for sure not you or me, by way, who are you really working for -- the most common, and legitimate, question that comes this way. Pat answer: we had no way of knowing what was going on, or, better, that's classified, or, even better, well yes we spied but will stop it, or best, sure we spy, for your protection, idiot.

1 November 2007

Previous:

nsa-ip-update10.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 10 October 21, 2007nsa-ip-update9.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 9 October 6, 2007nsa-ip-update8.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 8 September 14, 2007nsa-ip-update7.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 7 August 31, 2007nsa-ip-update6.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 6 August 16, 2007nsa-ip-update5.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 5 August 11, 2007nsa-ip-update4.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 4 August 5, 2007nsa-ip-update3.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated IP Resources 3 July 21, 2007nsa-ip-update2.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated Resources 2 July 16, 2007nsa-ip-update.htm + Latest Updated NSA-Affiliated Resources July 8, 2007nsa-ip-info.htm + NSA IP Packet Tracking and Analysis June 6, 2007nsa-ping.htm + NSA Resources For Rapid Targeting and Analysis June 2, 2007nsa-ip-blocks.htm + More NSA IP Blocks in CIDR Format Update May 28, 2007ip-tla.htm + IP Blocks Used by Terrorist Surveillance Program February 6, 2007

A sends:

The Static Network area on the Run OS Build Plans screen allows you to configure the target server networking as part of an OS deployment job.


NOTE: Only the deployment network interface can be configured using this screen.


To access the Server Network Configuration input fields you must select the Configure check box in the Static Network section on the Run OS Build Plans screen.

In order to configure a target server’s network, the target server must have a Deployment interface NIC already assigned. You can verify this on the screen. Note that servers added via their iLO but not booted into maintenance will not have a deployment NIC assigned yet.

The network configuration information defined on this screen is passed to the Build Plan by creating a special custom attribute for each server the Build Plan will be run on. The Inject personalization settings step of the OS installation Build Plan uses this custom attribute and modifies the installation configuration file accordingly.

The custom attribute will remain assigned to the server until it is deleted or overwritten by subsequent network personalization. Any future OS installations on the server will use the networking information defined by .

Screen componentDescription
Server Network Configuration
IP address

Static IP address (field displayed for a single server selection only).

Starting IP address

Initial IP address - servers will be assigned incremented static IP addresses beginning with this address (field displayed for the multiple server selection only).

Network mask

IPv4 mask representing the bits reserved for network identification (for example, 255.255.255.0).

Host name

Change the unqualified host name of the server from the name assigned when the server is first discovered to a name that has more meaning in your facility (field displayed for single server selection only).

Host name prefix

This field is only displayed for multiple server selection and is used with the Starting index to generate host names automatically.

Change the unqualified host name of the server from the name assigned when the server is first discovered to a name that has more meaning in your facility.

The servers selected will be given a host name beginning with this prefix and ending with a number starting with the Starting index and incrementing for each server.


NOTE: Host names are assigned top to bottom as displayed in the Run OS Build PlansServers table. Changing the table order affects host name and IP address assignments.


Starting index

This field is only displayed for multiple server selection and is used with the Host name prefix to generate host names automatically.

Change the unqualified host name of the server from the name assigned when the server is first discovered to a name that has more meaning in your facility.

The servers selected will be given a host name beginning with the Host name prefix and continuing with a number starting with this index and incrementing for each server.

You may add leading zeros to this field to increase the number of digits used for numbering.

Gateway

IP address of the node in your local network that allows communication to other networks.


NOTE: A gateway is required for OS deployment of ESXi 5.x.


DNS domain

Domain name portion of the DNS name.

DNS server

The IP address of the DNS server for your network.

View

Select View to display a table describing how the values will resolve for each host if this server configuration is saved. This allows you to see how addresses and names will be assigned before running the Build Plan.

  • Display Name – name displayed in the master pane

  • Host Name – server name you can set with the Host name text box in the Configure static network information area of the Run OS Build Plans screen

  • NIC – name of the NIC as set within the server

  • MAC address – hardware address for the NIC

  • IP address – assigned static IP address

Server Network Configuration screen details

Configure static networking information and change host name

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